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@Dominic

@andrestaltz well, I gotta say, that was a great blog post.
Especially, the term "offgrid" which works so well, I am certainly gonna be describing it like this from now on!

#offgrid

@mmckegg
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@mmckegg

SAME HERE! #offgrid ftw!

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@Christopher P.

That post is why I am here, it was very interesting.

@mikey
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@mikey

kudos @andrestaltz, i appreciate that you went through the effort to describe the unique approaches by Scuttlebutt in comparison to other distributed, federated, peer-to-peer systems, especially around concepts like how "the social graph is the network architecture, with peer-to-peer infrastructure accurately matching peer-to-peer interactions".

also welcome new Scuttlebutt uxers! :sparkles:

@neftaly

It's blowing up!

@Claudio Mezzasalma

@Elex yes, me too. As I said retweeting @andrestaltz's post, this is the way things should go in the world.

@andrestaltz
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@andrestaltz

Thanks @dinosaur @dominic @Matt ! It's mostly your achievement. :)
I'm excited to keep improving the platform.

@keithalexander
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@owen

Hey Dominic! I came from HN too. I remember you talking about this years ago. So glad it happened :)

@ansuz
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@ansuz

2017 year of the ssb desktop

@mix
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@b4LTqHnmP…

I wonder what the http://n-gate.com/ summary will be for the ssb post.

@mikey

fun stats :sparkles:

hey, here are some exciting numbers and graphs on the last day: :tada:

daily active users

we beat our previous record of ~100 daily active uxers from CampJS VII with 269+ uxers in one day!

ssb-daily-actives-07-04-17.png

scuttlebutt.nz

wow i really need to write some better documentation, srsly. :sweat_smile:

ssb-handbook-stats-07-04-17.png

ssbc/patchwork

here come the developers! :rocket: (i wonder if we can see stats on release downloads?)

patchwork-stats-04-07-17.png

:beers:

@mikey

hm, using GitHub Downloads Count, all time downloads of recent releases:

Patchwork-3.3.0-linux-x86_64.AppImage: 10 downloads
Patchwork-3.3.0-mac.dmg: 23 downloads
patchwork-3.3.0-windows.exe: 13 downloads
patchwork-3.2.2-linux-x86_64-1.AppImage: 17 downloads
patchwork-3.2.2-linux-x86_64.AppImage: 140 downloads
Patchwork-3.2.2-mac.dmg: 330 downloads
patchwork-3.2.2-windows.exe: 152 downloads
@mikey

also ssb.rootsystems.nz has over 200 followers now, after only being online for 3 weeks.

@mikey

ssb-graphviz

haha wow, the graph is growing. :seedling:

rootsystems-graph-07-04-17.png

@cryptix

some screenhots from bakc in january are here.

@dinosaur: just same random WOHA brain-fart. How hard would it be to add a time slider to graphviz? So you can scroll back and forth and see the mesh getting build. Maybe I should just look into how modular gource is...

@jake
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@casaubon
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@casaubon

This is probably not the right place to ask, but I was wondering, how would I deal with data storage using Patchwork as time goes by? Is there an easy way to say clear everything in my archive that is more than a month old?

@Vince Hodges
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@substack

The post is on boingboing now: http://boingboing.net/2017/04/07/bug-in-tech-for-antipreppers.html

@bret
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@cel

Is there an easy way to say clear everything in my archive that is more than a month old?

find ~/.ssb/blobs -type f -mtime +30 -exec rm {} \+

@Dominic

@owen you made it! yeah, I've been working on it for years! and still a lot to be done!

@therealklanni
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@iamcherta
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@CrowderSoup
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@CrowderSoup

@Dominic I've been trying to convince my wife and family that this should be a thing for years now. Just have never had the time to work on it! Glad someone else did!

@robin

@Dominic

Especially, the term "offgrid"

grids are great. the so-called grid we use from Comcast, AT&AT, <your-hated-telco-here> aren't really grids, they are hierarchical trees. ssb is a grid, as it tends towards a horizontal pattern, not vertical.

Long live the grid!

@anarcat

shouldn't this be automated somehow? should an issue be filed?

@robin

From https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/grid-book

The Grid Book, by Hannah B Higgins

Emblematic of modernity, the grid is the underlying form of everything from skyscrapers and office cubicles to paintings by Mondrian and a piece of computer code. And yet, as Hannah Higgins makes clear in this engaging and evocative book, the grid has a history that long predates modernity; it is the most prominent visual structure in Western culture. In The Grid Book, Higgins examines the history of ten grids that changed the world: the brick, the tablet, the gridiron city plan, the map, musical notation, the ledger, the screen, moveable type, the manufactured box, and the net. Charting the evolution of each grid, from the Paleolithic brick of ancient Mesopotamia through the virtual connections of the Internet, Higgins demonstrates that once a grid is invented, it may bend, crumble, or shatter, but its organizing principle never disappears. The appearance of each grid was a watershed event. Brick, tablet, and city gridiron made possible sturdy housing, the standardization of language, and urban development. Maps, musical notation, financial ledgers, and moveable type promoted the organization of space, music, and time, international trade, and mass literacy. The screen of perspective painting heralded the science of the modern period, classical mechanics, and the screen arts, while the standardization of space made possible by the manufactured box suggested the purified box forms of industrial architecture and visual art. The net, the most ancient grid, made its first appearance in Stone Age Finland; today, the loose but clearly articulated networks of the World Wide Web suggest that we are in the middle of an emergent grid that is reshaping the world, as grids do, in its image.

More than going offgrid, what we are doing is throwing out the fake grid and building our own real grid. "Offgrid" has become a buzzword, a marketing term with little substance other than vague hand-waving ideas about rejecting society.

@robin

Aka the lattice, the web, the net, anarchist/autonomous political ideology, the rhizome, the Unix philosophy. They exist throughout anti-hierarchical, horizontal movements and are an essential, perhaps defining part of these ideas.

@robin

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_City_is_Not_a_Tree
http://www.patternlanguage.com/archive/cityisnotatree.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhizome_%28philosophy%29

@Dominic

@robin.paulson yes! ssb is the off-grid grid. side note, back in the now lost mammoth renaming bikeshed thread "grid" was suggested (which is the name of the network in Tron).

@Dominic

@CrowderSoup you where right all along!

@Dominic

@anarcat you are refering to clearing out blobs, right?

We know we'll need it one day, we just havn't really needed it yet. Though since suddenly lots of people are suddenly joining, we might need it soon. We'd certainly be happy to merge if you made a PR for this.

@Sandy
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@b4LTqHnmP…

There it is.

A webshit brags about the number of atrocities his friends have committed with javascript. The latest atrocity is a facebook clone as implemented by Bitcoin Idiots, LLC. Hackernews rambles about social networks gone by before settling down into the usual wheelspinning about how we could solve every problem with the blockchain if the adults would just stop laughing long enough to install these six thousand npm libraries on all their devices and stop using any other method of communication.

@alexip
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@ansuz

I love people who hate javascript. They're so much fun!

@bret

Ahh, nihilism. tldr We should all just commit suicide.

@andrestaltz

It's like reverse psychology. The more you hate it, the more people will use it.

@Wao
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@ppiixx
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@Fonz

It's always a love / hate relationship with Javascript :confused:. Otherwise it's insanity.

@DiamondBrain
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@interfect

I love people who hate javascript. They're so much fun!

They're always so good at Javascript, too.

@Mischa
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@Vendan-Old

I hate JS, and am not that good at it :P

But at least I'm trying to do something about the JS overflow, instead of complaining. Also, :wave: Hi @interfect, you happen to be https://github.com/interfect?

@ansuz

The stages of Javascript development

  1. I hate javascript because it makes no sense
  2. I hate javascript because it makes sense, but it isn't intuitive
  3. I hate javascript because it makes sense, but its many runtimes' quirks make it challenging
  4. I hate javascript and I can list all the reasons why
  5. I hate javascript but it's the best tool for this job
  6. I hate javascript, but I have strategies that make it easier
  7. I hate javascript because it was so nice until they added classes
@interfect

@Vendan The one and only!

@Dominic

I'm at stage 7

@dangerousbeans

stage 5 is too real

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@ansuz

I assume there are more stages, but these are the ones I have experienced or witnessed.

@Ross Schulman

"I hate javascript because WebAssembly exists but hasn't kicked JS to the curb yet"?

@Joseph B
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@greg
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@old_hsribei
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@exempli gratia
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@prashere

My understanding of Gossip protocol is that, data is not lost until the last user has it, and so it would be restored whenever we connect with the user or network. Wouldn't connecting bring back those data again?

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