You are reading content from Scuttlebutt
Feed of @joeyh

https://joeyh.name/

Haskell hacker, offgrid, free software developer for 20 years, crowdfunded.

@joeyh
Re: %AR5KDA81T

Finished burying the water line today, took 3 more hours. Guestimating it was 10-12 hrs in total.

@joeyh

Preparing for flood, I expect the river will entirely cut me off from everything for 3 days or so.

@joeyh
Voted #new-zealand I find myself embarrassed sometimes at the way NZ seems to pr
@joeyh

Think I may be able to use battery box's air vent as a heat source to help keep water line from freezing where it goes into house.

@joeyh
Re: %YT3pwIg+R

My water project todo list seems to be only getting longer:

soon

  • Cut out and replace failed valve coming off of propane water heater, which leaks scalding water and steam right next to inverter (yikes! luckily there are other shutoff valves)
  • Fix line I capped off under kitchen sink, that has a slow drip due to bad threads
  • Fix/replace bathtub faucet, which fails to divert all water up to shower head due to I think rusting away inside
  • Install shower head
  • Replace old kitchen faucet with something higher
  • Finish burying water line
  • Final connection of water line to house

by summer

  • Level and prep pads (build a water level)
  • Install water tanks
  • Install water pressure gauge
  • Install water pressure sensor and pull data into automation, calibrate to tanks, code up low water alert etc
  • Run overflow line from water tanks on hill down to large auxillary cistern that's fed by the other spring

eventually

  • Replace unused pressure tank in house with small holding tank (to let the water temp come up to house ambient, so washing hands w/o hot water is not painful)
  • Add pump on overflow line, so water can be pumped up from other spring when necessary
  • Run overflow line from auxillary cistern over to place where I want a waterfall and small pond (waterfall will flow whenever the solar pump decides to run and all the tanks are full)
  • Add solar preheater in front of tankless propane heater (probably photovoltaic dump load w/water tank)
@joeyh
Re: %YT3pwIg+R

hermes butt dancing
hermes butt dancing
hermes butt dancing

video:first_running_water_hollow.webm

hermes butt dancing
hermes butt dancing
hermes butt dancing

@joeyh
Re: %YT3pwIg+R

Previously

@joeyh

solar powered gravity flow water system success!

I have running water in my house!

Long way from being done with this, but I turned on the solar pump, temporarily connected the pipe to the temporary 50 gallon drum, and jacked it into my house's plumbing.

And I waited, and waited, water was going up the hill, but not coming down. I dreaded that perhaps the buried pipe had a kink in it. Waited. Air started coming out. Gusher!

30+ psi! This is with less than 4 feet of water in the tank, and it's 8 feet above living level in the house, so the final system should have even more pressure.

And then I opened the valves intto the house, and that was another tense tense moment, because who knows if this random pipe I found really goes into the house. Well, it does. :joy:

pressure.jpg

Planning to turn off the pump and leave this overnight as a pressure test, hopefully it will keep pressure up and there's no some leak in the old pipe I found where it goes down 8 feet underground to the house.

And in the meantime, I have some plumbing to do in the house, this comes into the hot water side so iI have to cut pipes and switch things around.

@joeyh
Re: %AR5KDA81T

Hoped to finish burying the pipe today, but had to stop 1/3rd of the way. Ran out of pex. :-(

I had bought some more at the hardware store, but it was much more flexible, and kinked when I pushed it into the trench.

Apparantly there are not only pex-a, pex-b, pex-c, but within pex-b there's variation in flexibility; Sharkbite markets their pex-b as being more flexible. Nobody at the HW store even knew what pex-b was..

@joeyh
Voted Me and [@Isabela](@Xe+wuSGAaEdwgyI/ql2WVgPG64Mqf8tVHU0VXne9Ki8=.ed25519) ca

Show whole feed
Join Scuttlebutt now