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Re: %e0omdOpsh

In the UK a few years back, we stayed with farming relatives. Good people, a tenant farmer born in the house he still lived in.
Cropping farmers now contract to the eventual purchasers of the crop, and the sowing and management of the crop, pesticides and nutrients etc, is specified for them.
I know nothing about farming, but there was mention about how, each year, it was taking more of the agrichemicals to maintain the results.
In 2014 the University of Sheffield published a report that the UK had just 100 more harvests left in it's soil.
What did we expect?

@bob
Re: %e0omdOpsh

@nanomonkey it is my (very limited) understanding that while some tests have been run on glyphosate, they have not been run on what is sold, which is glyphosate combined with a number of admixtures to variously 'improve' and/or target the effect of the stuff.

@bob
Voted [Decentralization: An Incomplete Ambition](https://osf.io/m7wyj/) by Nathan
@bob
Re: %+tpxvPF98

I was struck, on reading that, at how decentralisation in the long ago and far away was far more a literal, concrete thing...at least in the day to day lives of the common people (of which I am one).
So, the first Police/Justice/Traffic central mainframe in NZ was sited in Wanganui, not Wellington, and we were told this was decentralisation.
Nowadays, so much (like this thread I am adding to) is potentially everywhere at once. In the context of that, where centres are everywhere and nowhere, the word becomes meaningless.
And I was left thinking how that is another quantum change humanity has had to absorb.
Which gave me a headache.
Then this:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=avP-8i_YEO8

@bob
Voted finished my product for the current client, handing over was done yesterday
@bob
Voted Thanks for the link, @ibob. What a beautiful and fascinating and plant – it
@bob
Re: %ZgKH4scL8

@kas I'm also interested in how the ''received wisdom' (the problem is the possum) hardens over time into 'fact', principally through repetition without challenge.
And the same, I think, happens with many assumptions: the author expressed surprise at finding tui and bellbirds in the same place, the received wisdom being that the tui will chase the bellbirds off.
I could tell her that yes, they will, but the bellbirds will return and seize the opportunity when they can: we see this every summer at our flax.
It's the growing circle of darkness???

@bob
Voted It is, indeed, a parasitic plant. So is the broomrape (_Orobanche hederæ_)
@bob
Re: %ZgKH4scL8

@kas good stuff!

Here is a nice (if rather long) article about the so-called NZ mistletoe, which is a very beautiful scarlet but increasingly rare. It is commonly held that the principal problem is the (Australian) possum, which we struggle to control here, but it seems there may be problems due to loss of pollinating bird species too:
https://www.nzgeo.com/stories/the-mystery-of-the-disappearing-mistletoes/

@bob
Voted But so so many wildflowers and heady spring air.

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